Friday, July 18, 2014

Modernization of Madrasas

NAGPUR: There is a cautious response in Muslim community to the Rs100 crore aide announced by finance minister for modernization of madrasas. Fears of government interference and confusion over how the money is to be utilized needs to be cleared, feel Muslims connected with various educational institutions.

The 250 madrasas in city are both traditional and modern. The modern institutions offer a number of courses, both professional and technical, and traditional ones teach Koran to children. "Most of the traditional madrasas are run on money received as zakat. So they will not accept this aide," says Javed Ahmad Ansari, president of United Muslim Students Association.

Opposing the gesture, Muslim scholar and writer M Sharuddin Sahil says that such aides in the past have been misused. "Just giving aid is not sufficient. Government should also keep a track of how it is being used." These madrasas will need to change their curriculum if they wish to utilize it, he feels.

Not sure of what the government means by suggesting modernization, Abdul Bari, vice-president of Jamiyat Ulema Hind says that there is no scope for modernizing a madrasa. "Koran is taught by heart to children and the method of doing so is ancient. It cannot be changed. So, what is to be done with this money? I feel it will invite a lot of interference from the government if the money is accepted."

Questioning the purpose behind the gesture, Mufti Qadri, state president of Jame Arbiya Islamia, says, "A boy who is going to a madrasa doesn't need modernization. For that there are innumerable English medium schools." Qadri feels that money given by the government falls in wrong hands as the real madrasas do not accept it. "The purpose of this aide should be spelt out and it should be easy to collect," he says.

Muslims sceptical about aide to madrasas

NAGPUR: There is a cautious response in Muslim community to the Rs100 crore aide announced by finance minister for modernization of madrasas. Fears of government interference and confusion over how the money is to be utilized needs to be cleared, feel Muslims connected with various educational institutions.

The 250 madrasas in city are both traditional and modern. The modern institutions offer a number of courses, both professional and technical, and traditional ones teach Koran to children. "Most of the traditional madrasas are run on money received as zakat. So they will not accept this aide," says Javed Ahmad Ansari, president of United Muslim Students Association.

Opposing the gesture, Muslim scholar and writer M Sharuddin Sahil says that such aides in the past have been misused. "Just giving aid is not sufficient. Government should also keep a track of how it is being used." These madrasas will need to change their curriculum if they wish to utilize it, he feels.

Not sure of what the government means by suggesting modernization, Abdul Bari, vice-president of Jamiyat Ulema Hind says that there is no scope for modernizing a madrasa. "Koran is taught by heart to children and the method of doing so is ancient. It cannot be changed. So, what is to be done with this money? I feel it will invite a lot of interference from the government if the money is accepted."

Questioning the purpose behind the gesture, Mufti Qadri, state president of Jame Arbiya Islamia, says, "A boy who is going to a madrasa doesn't need modernization. For that there are innumerable English medium schools." Qadri feels that money given by the government falls in wrong hands as the real madrasas do not accept it. "The purpose of this aide should be spelt out and it should be easy to collect," he says.

Muslims sceptical about aide to madrasas


Sunday, April 6, 2014

Now, a separate engineering entrance test for state minorities

Bengal will have a separate engineering entrance test for minority students. Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka already have such a system following a Supreme Court directive that minority associations can hold separate admission tests.

Maulana Azad National Urdu University mulls centre for religious studies

HYDERABAD: The Maulana Azad National Urdu University (Manuu) is planning to set up a Deeni Taleemi Markaz or the Centre for Religious Studies in the city with a view to developing "moderate and balanced" leadership among students in various fields.

Friday, January 3, 2014

FutureLearn to provide the platform for the British Council's first ever MOOCs

NEW DELHI: FutureLearn, the first UK-led provider of massive open online courses (MOOCs), will provide the platform for the British Council's first foray into free, web-based, higher education study.
The British Council will use the FutureLearn platform to launch its first ever MOOCs, designed to help people develop proficiency in English. The new web-based courses will build on the British Council's expertise in supporting learners and teachers to improve and assess their English language ability globally. Building on this experience, the British Council and FutureLearn are working closely together to create a portfolio of English language MOOCs, and to provide a route for learners to take International English Language Testing System (IELTS) assessments at British Council testing centres. The new MOOCs will enable learners around the world to prepare for higher education study in English, and to communicate in English more effectively.

Happy New Year 2014


Wednesday, November 27, 2013

CABA-MDTP, CCC and O Level Admission Notice for the Session January 2014

    Important Dates for the session January 2014
    Submission of Registration form by the students : 29th November 2013
    Interview by selection committee : 02nd to 03rd December 2013
    Display of final list of selected candidates : 05th December 2013
    Payment of fees by selected candidates : 06th December 2013
    Receipt of list of candidates with Registration fees at NCPUL : 16th December 2013
    Commencement of Classes : 2nd January 2013

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Education can eliminate violence, the Dalai Lama says

 Education can eliminate "the very basis of violence and war" and this century will become a century of peace and non-violence, Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lamasaid here on Wednesday.

The Tibetan leader was speaking on the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr's historic march and speech.